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The Words Coming Out of Your Mouth

     From the Christian bible, there is a verse that says in part, "For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks."  Since I'm big on diplomacy and tact, this scripture resonates emphatically with me because it challenges us all to think about what we are hiding in our hearts.  If our words reflect what our heart holds, then is our heart loving and optimistic or is it hateful and negative.  Are we harboring revenge, and its spewing forth in language that destroys another person's reputation?  Or are we hopeful for someone else's success; therefore, our words about them are encouraging and helpful?
    
   
     In this present day, words have been used to create division among entire groups of people, not just individuals.  We are wielding them like a reckless drunk with a gun in a crowded venue.  We say them without a lot of thought, or if we are thinking, those thoughts are selfish and superficial.
     It is time that we start doing more self-examination and hold ourselves accountable for what we are saying.  We must recognize that if our hearts influence our words, then what kind of heart do we have?  If its filled with hate, then you must call yourself out as a hateful person.  But also know, hate can be overcome with love.  Furthermore, love is not divisive, judgmental, selfish, arrogant or prejudiced.  It is healing, considerate, accepting, joyful, and spiritual.  It benefits the giver and the receiver.  This day and everyday choose love, and let your words reflect it.

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